News Archive

  • The Search for Life in the Solar System

    NASA’s Jim Green gives a nod to Georgia Tech scientists’ role

    Scientists are getting ready to take giant leaps in their search for life in our solar system.

    James Green , director of NASA’s Planetary Sciences Division, wowed a standing-room-only Georgia Tech crowd on Monday with a guided tour of Europa, Mars, the dwarf planet and former asteroid Ceres, and other celestial bodies that might contain the basic recipes for life.

  • Raquel Lieberman Is Having A Great Year, and It’s Only February

    Million-dollar grant renewal, invitation to PLoS Biology’s board makes it a February to remember

    Raquel Lieberman, associate professor at the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is having the Best. Winter. Ever.

    Raquel Lieberman has started the year with excellent news: She’s been asked to serve on the academic editorial board of a major scientific journal, and she and her research team can continue their work on early-stage glaucoma, thanks to this month’s renewal of a $1.48 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant.

  • DAVID COLLARD NAMED TO FACULTY HALL OF FAME

    The professor of chemistry and biochemistry and College of Sciences’ associate dean is the unanimous choice for recognition by the University System of Georgia

    David M. Collard is the recipient of the 2017 Felton Jenkins, Jr. Hall of Fame Faculty Award for the research and comprehensive universities sector of the University System of Georgia (USG).

    David M. Collard is the recipient of the 2017 Felton Jenkins, Jr. Hall of Fame Faculty Award for the research and comprehensive universities sector of the University System of Georgia (USG). The award, which invites nominations from across USG, recognizes a faculty member for strong commitment to teaching and student success.

  • Research Scientist and Jazz Aficionado M.G. Finn Awarded with Endowed Chair

    The James A. Carlos Family Chair for Pediatric Technology opens new doors to lifesaving research in pediatric medicine

    The James A. Carlos Family Chair for Pediatric Technology opens new doors to lifesaving research in pediatric medicine.

    The office of M.G. Finn in the Molecular Science and Engineering Building blends chemistry and jazz. Amid an extensive library of science literature and textbooks is a large photograph of jazz musicians posing in 1950s Harlem. The black-and-white photo evokes creativity, innovation, and inspiration; it hangs directly across Finn’s desk and occupies a prominent space in his field of vision. The juxtaposition of keen intellectual pursuits against avid enthusiasm for improvisation reflects Finn’s approach to scientific leadership.

  • The Frog Tongue Is A High-Speed Adhesive

    First-person account of research revealing the workings of the frog tongue

    The versatile frog tongue can grab wet, hairy and slippery surfaces with equal ease. It does a lot better than our engineered adhesives – not even household tapes can firmly stick to wet or dusty surfaces.

    The versatile frog tongue can grab wet, hairy and slippery surfaces with equal ease. It does a lot better than our engineered adhesives – not even household tapes can firmly stick to wet or dusty surfaces. What makes this tongue even more impressive is its speed: Over 4,000 species of frog and toad snag prey faster than a human can blink. What makes the frog tongue so uniquely sticky? Our group aimed to find out.

  • Wade Barnes Receives Highest Award From Georgia Tech Alumni Association

    The School of Biological Sciences alumnus is a member of the College of Sciences Advisory Board

    The College of Sciences warmly congratulates Wade Barnes for receiving the Joseph Mayo Pettit Distinguished Service Award, the highest award conferred by the Georgia Tech Alumni Association.

    The College of Sciences warmly congratulates Wade Barnes for receiving the Joseph Mayo Pettit Distinguished Service Award, the highest award conferred by the Georgia Tech Alumni Association. An alumnus of the School of Biological Sciences (B.S. Biology 1971), Barnes is a founding partner and physician at North Florida OB/GYN Associates.

  • Size Matters for Marine Protected Areas Designed to Aid Coral

    For marine protected areas established to help coral reefs recover from overfishing, size really does seem to make a difference.

    For marine protected areas established to help coral reefs recover from overfishing, size really does seem to make a difference. 

  • Cholera Bacteria Stab and Poison Enemies so Predictably

    Scientists use physics equations that describe molecular interactions to predict bacterial battles; find correlation in genomes between weaponry and resource sharing

    The actions of bacteria locked in battle are nearly as calculable as a chemical reaction.

    Could bacteria with aggressive weapons someday replace some antibiotics? Perhaps. Researchers are using math to predict cholera strains' effectiveness against competing cholera, as they stab and poison each other on the battlefield. Being able to calculate the action virtually as well as a chemical reaction helps open the door to biomedical and other engineering uses.

  • They are Scholars, Hear Them Roar

    2017 class of Petit Undergraduate Research Scholars most diverse in program history

    2017 class of Petit Undergraduate Research Scholars most diverse in program history

    2017 class of Petit Undergraduate Research Scholars most diverse in program history

  • Looking for Entangled Atoms in a Bose-Einstein Condensate

    Using a Bose-Einstein condensate composed of sodium atoms, Georgia Tech researchers have observed a sharp magnetically-induced quantum phase transition where they expect to find entangled atomic pairs.

    Using a Bose-Einstein condensate composed of millions of sodium atoms, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have observed a sharp magnetically-induced quantum phase transition where they expect to find entangled atomic pairs. The work moves scientists closer to an elusive entangled state that would have potential sensing and computing applications beyond its basic science interests.