News Archive

  • Biochemistry Student Named a Rhodes Scholar

    Calvin Runnels Studies the Origins of Life

    Calvin Runnels, a biochemistry student from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the sixth student in Tech history to be named a Rhodes Scholar.

    Calvin Runnels, a biochemistry student from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the sixth student in Tech history to be named a Rhodes Scholar.

  • Joshua Weitz Elected AAAS Fellow

    For contributions to the field of viral ecology

    For his contributions to the field of viral ecology, Joshua Weitz has been elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

    Scholar, educator, award-winning book author, interdisciplinary innovator, and shaper of future scientists, Joshua S. Weitz wears many hats at Georgia Tech, but his influence reaches far beyond. For his contributions to the field of viral ecology, Joshua Weitz has been elected a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

  • Advancing the Path to Organic Electronics Beyond Cell Phone Screens

    N-doping achieved with the help of ultraviolet light, improving organic semiconductor conductivity.

    N-doping achieved with the help of ultraviolet light, improving organic semiconductor conductivity.

  • 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Include Six from the College of Sciences

    Advancing Georgia Tech’s inclusivity through grassroots initiatives

    Minda Monteagudo and Conan Zhao are among six members of the College of Sciences community to be named 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Fellows.

    Minda Monteagudo and Conan Zhao are among six members of the College of Sciences community to be named 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Fellows. The program brings together faculty, staff, and students who individually and collectively advance their action, research, or teaching objectives while enhancing the culture of inclusive excellence at Tech.

  • A Popular Tool to Trace Earth’s Oxygen History Can Give False Positives

    A system to determine the presence of ancient oxygen by testing rock layers may need to be taken with a grain of salt.

    If someone cries "Eureka!" because it looks like oxygen appeared in Earth's ancient atmosphere long before the body of evidence indicates, consider this: If it was a chromium isotope system reading of ancient rock that caused the enthusiasm, it might need to be curbed.

  • Powerful New Tool for Genome Analysis

    Petit Institute core facility at Georgia Tech adds new equipment and services, allowing researchers to dive deeper

    Petit Institute core facility at Georgia Tech adds new equipment and services, allowing researchers to dive deeper

    Petit Institute core facility at Georgia Tech adds new equipment and services, allowing researchers to dive deeper

  • Science Majors Are Among Inaugural Sustainable Undergraduate Research Fellows

    Cohort will design Kendeda Living Building's dashboard

    Ten Georgia Tech undergraduates were selected as the inaugural (2017-2018) class of Sustainable Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURF).

    Ten Georgia Tech undergraduates were selected as the inaugural (2017-2018) class of Sustainable Undergraduate Research Fellows (SURF). Among them are Faizah Asif, from the School of Biological Sciences, and Gigi Pavur, from the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences.

  • Two from College of Sciences Are Finalists in 2017 Three Minute Thesis Competition

    Kelly Michie and Linda Nhon join 11 others in explaining their research in three minutes

    Come see the final round of the 2017 Three Minute Thesis Competition on Monday, Nov. 13, in the Student Center Ballroom.

    Figuring out how to help 6.5 million Americans who suffer from chronic wounds each year is a problem Kelly Michie has researched for years. Recently she’s faced another challenge — squeezing all of that research into a three-minute presentation for the 2017 Georgia Tech Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition.   

  • Google Plugs In Georgia Tech Chemistry Team’s Software for its Quantum Computing Product

    Search giant’s new software could help future powerful computers unlock chemistry’s secrets

    A team of Georgia Tech chemistry researchers will have its software included in Google's new quantum computing software product.

    Someday, quantum computing will let researchers do faster, cheaper data processing. When that day comes, chemistry could turn out to be quantum computing's killer app. Georgia Tech researchers have written a popular suite of software programs for quantum chemistry work, and Google has announced it will use that suite in its new free, open-source quantum computing software product.

  • Neuroscience and Neurotechnology at Tech

    Across Georgia Tech, researchers, scientists, and students are creating the next breakthroughs in understanding this complex system, treatments of neurological diseases and injuries, and tools to improve neural function.