News and Events

Latest News From the College of Sciences

  • Using Data Mining to Make Sense of Climate Change

    Georgia Tech has developed a new way of mining data from climate data sets that is more self-contained than traditional tools. The methodology brings out commonalities of data sets without as much expertise from the user, allowing scientists to trust the data and get more robust — and transparent — results.

  • 2018 Smith Medal to Mark Hay

    Mark E. Hay, Regents Professor and Harry and Linda Teasley Chair in the School of Biological Sciences at Georgia Tech, is the recipient of the 2018 Gilbert Morgan Smith Medal of the National Academy of Sciences. The award recognizes Hay’s research into algal science, with implications for the world’s imperiled coral reefs.

  • Mathematics Fuels Space Exploration

    Space mission designers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and mathematicians from Georgia Tech and Yeshiva University are gathering for a four-day workshop. The participants will work together in using mathematical tools to lower the fuel consumption of spacecraft through trajectory design.

  • Hide or Get Eaten, Urine Chemicals Tell Mud Crabs

    Mud crabs hide for their lives if blue crabs, which prey upon them, pee anywhere near them. Pinpointing urine compounds for the first time that warn the mud crabs of predatory peril initiates a new level of understanding of how chemicals invisibly regulate undersea wildlife and ecosystems.

  • MLK Sunday Supper Tradition at Georgia Tech Marks Sixth Year

    For the sixth year in a row, the Georgia Tech community will partake of a community meal to discuss the life and legacy of civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. The meal is called Sunday Supper, even though it takes place during the workweek. The gathering evokes Sunday dinners of yore, when two or more generations of family and friends shared a comforting meal. It was a time to exchange stories, learn family histories, and discuss current events or concerns. 

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