News Archive

  • Georgia Tech @ 2018 Atlanta Science Festival

    College of Sciences Dean Paul Goldbart is annual science fest’s first honorary chair

    The festival’s board of directors selected College of Sciences Dean and Sutherland Chair Paul M. Goldbart to serve as inaugural honorary chair.

    Spring in Atlanta is just a few weeks away, and with it arrives science festival time. The 2018 Atlanta Science Festival (2018ASF) shifts the annual festivities to fifth gear with two major innovations: two weeks of science fun – March 9-24, 2018 – instead of one and the designation of an honorary chair.

  • Agarwal, Warnke Named 2018 Sloan Research Fellows

    Early-career scholars join 124 other recipients from the U.S. and Canada

    Vinayak Agarwal and Lutz Warnke are among 126 outstanding U.S. and Canadian researchers selected to receive the 2018 Sloan Research Fellowships.

    Awarded yearly by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Sloan Research Fellowships honor early-career faculty whose achievements mark them as among the very best scientific minds working today.

  • Bonnie Harris: Seeing the Best in Others

    Program director at CEISMC reflects on Black History Month

    The College of Sciences celebrates Black History Month by inviting the perspectives of African-American colleagues.

    February is Black History Month, a special time set aside to celebrate the contributions of African Americans. The College of Sciences joins the celebration by inviting the perspectives of African-American colleagues through a two-part Q&A.

  • Hunting for Leftovers in a Refrigerator Cave

    Documentary features Jenny McGuire and her work with well-preserved fossils from Natural Trap Cave

    Jenny McGuire collects well-preserved fossils from Natural Trap Cave for her research.

    Jenny McGuire is one of several scientists featured in a documentary that WyomingPBS will air twice in February. 

  • Lewis Wheaton: Success Comes with Responsibility

    Associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences reflects on Black History Month

    The College of Sciences celebrates Black History Month by inviting the perspectives of African-American colleagues.

    February is Black History Month, a special time set aside to celebrate the contributions of African Americans. The College of Sciences joins the celebration by inviting the perspectives of African-American colleagues through a two-part Q&A.

  • Metro Atlanta Area High School Students Participate in STEM Competition

    CEISMC hosts Georgia Tech Division C Atlanta regional tournament for 2018 Science Olympiad

    CEISMC hosts Georgia Tech Division Atlanta C regional tournament for 2018 Science Olympiad.

    CEISMC hosted a Division C regional tournament for the Science Olympiad, a nationally recognized competition for enhancing science education and interest. The regional tournament took place at Georgia Tech in the G. Wayne Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons.

  • What Does Georgia Tech Think of First-Passage Percolation?

    Michael Damron is coauthor of a book that has the answer

    Book updates the state-of-the-art in the rapidly growing field.

    First-passage percolation (FPP) is a simplified model to describe growth in a random medium. The field has grown rapidly in the past 10 years, but the last comprehensive survey of the field took place in the 1980’s. This book summarizes the state of the art for graduate students and researchers planning to work on this topic.

  • Why Is Winter the Best Time to See Stars?

    Winter nights provide better conditions than summer skies

    Three reasons why winter's starry nights are so clear and bright

    The next time you are outside on a cloudless night, look up at the stars. If they look brighter or seem clearer during these winter nights, it’s not your imagination. Winter is actually better than summer when it comes to sky gazing.

  • Hatchet Enzyme, Enabler of Sickness and of Health, Exposed by Neutron Beams

    A pioneering glimpse inside elusive cell membranes exposes a major player in cell health but also in hepatitis C and in Alzheimer's.

    A pioneering glimpse inside elusive cell membranes illuminates a player in cell health but also in hepatitis C and in Alzheimer's. With the most powerful research neutron beams in the country, researchers open a portal into the hidden world of intramembrane proteins, which a third of the human genome is required to create.

  • Small Things Considered at Suddath Symposium

    Annual two-day event showcases thought leaders in microbiology research from Georgia Tech and beyond

    Annual two-day event showcases thought leaders in microbiology research from Georgia Tech and beyond

    Annual two-day event showcases thought leaders in microbiology research from Georgia Tech and beyond