News Archive

  • Eclipse 2017 @ Georgia Tech Lights Up Campus

    The campus community comes out to have fun and celebrate science on the first day of classes

    With an emphasis on fun and science on the first day of classes, the Georgia Tech community turned out to watch Monday’s partial solar eclipse.

    Monday’s solar eclipse gave Tech students a unique way to mark the first day of fall classes. It also provided a look at the scientific research associated with this celestial event, and it may have inspired younger minds to consider science in their futures.

  • Round Two for Quantitative Biosciences

    Georgia Tech interdisciplinary graduate program in QBioS welcomes second cohort

    Georgia Tech interdisciplinary graduate program in QBioS welcomes second cohort

    Georgia Tech interdisciplinary graduate program in QBioS welcomes second cohort

  • Eclipse Reflections from the Experts

    Georgia Tech faculty share their eclipse experiences

    Faculty members provide their thoughts on witnessing the solar eclipse.

    Atlanta experienced 97 percent coverage during Monday’s solar eclipse. But as seasoned eclipse chasers warned, “close is not close enough.” That’s why many of Georgia Tech’s planetary researchers, and others, travelled away from campus to visit the narrow path of totality throughout the country. We asked them what they saw and felt during the celestial event.

  • Predictive Powers of Gene Expression

    Petit Institute researchers at Georgia Tech use novel approach to predict disease risk in Crohn’s disease study

    Petit Institute researchers at Georgia Tech use novel approach to predict disease risk in Crohn’s disease study

    Petit Institute researchers at Georgia Tech use novel approach to predict disease risk in Crohn’s disease study

  • Eclipse Show Time at Georgia Tech

    Campus is primed for solar sensation; College of Sciences dean welcomes new students

    Eclipse day is here. Georgia Tech is ready for a safe and fun experience.

    The last blockbuster of the summer season promises to be more spectacular than any movie about superheroes or shape-shifting robots. This particular show has been going on since human history has been recorded, and it’s back once again to thrill and educate everyone, including the Georgia Tech community.

  • Researchers Use Eclipse Data to Create Musical Composition

    Live data will be used to complete the piece on Monday during celestial event

    Composition uses sounds to symbolize the movements of the sun and moon and the gradual darkness they will produce during Monday's eclipse.

    A team of Georgia Institute of Technology researchers has created an original music composition for Monday’s eclipse. The Georgia Tech Sonification Lab uses drums, synthesized tones and other sounds to symbolize the movements of the sun and moon and the gradual darkness they will produce during the August 21 event. The audio experience, which at times sounds both hopeful and ominous as it builds anticipation toward the moment of the total eclipse, includes several segments.

  • Convocation Speaker Looking to Make a Difference

    Gigi Pavur will look out into the faces of almost 4,000 Tech freshmen, transfer students, and parents, and officially welcome them into the Georgia Tech community on Sunday

    Gigi Pavur will look out into the faces of almost 4,000 Tech freshmen, transfer students, and parents, and officially welcome them into the Georgia Tech community on Sunday

  • CEISMC Receives NSF Grant to Examine Factors Influencing Teacher Retention

    With a $426,500 National Science Foundation grant, CEISMC will study the role of social networks and self-efficacy in teacher retention at high-needs schools.

    CEISMC receives NSF grant to study the role of social networks and self-efficacy in teacher retention at high-needs schools.

    CEISMC has been awarded a two-year  National Science Foundation (NSF) grant of $426,500 to explore social networks and self-efficacy as factors influencing the retention of Noyce teachers in high-needs schools. Funded by NSF, the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program recruits and prepares highly effective K-12 STEM educators to teach in high-needs schools

  • Spray-on Electric Rainbows: Making Safer Electrochromic Inks

    A flick of a switch, and electrochromic films change their colors. Now they can be applied more safely thanks to an innovation with water.

    A flick of a switch, and electrochromic films change their colors. Now they can be applied more safely and more commonly thanks to an innovative chemical process that makes them water soluble. They can be sprayed and printed, instead of being confined behind safety implements to handle volatile and toxic fumes. 

  • Strengthening Connections with Peking University

    Second year of summer workshops in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences is another step toward joint degree program

    Georgia Tech's School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences hosts undergraduates from Peking University for the 2nd consecutive summer.

    Nine Peking University students learned how Georgia Tech researchers study air quality and climate science during the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences' second summer workshop for PKU undergraduates.