News and Events

Latest News From the College of Sciences

Explorers of multicellularity: (from left) Kimberly Chen, Will Ratcliff, Frank Rosenzweig, and Matt Herron (Credit: Jennifer Pentz)
Avoiding predators may explain why some single-celled organisms became multicellular.
HFES-GT winning for Best Action Plan
Psychology graduate student group promotes good design in everyday life.
nathan_fist_pump
Sal Barone, an academic professional in the School of Mathematics and former American Ninja Warrior, helps inspire the next generation of Ninjas.
Professor John McDonald
Research on the early detection of ovarian cancer will get a boost from a new award from the Prevent Cancer Foundation.
Studying snakes on granular surfaces
A new study shows how the motion of snakes moving across a sandy surface can be affected by obstacles.

Upcoming Events

Mar
19
2019
Dr. Jennifer Leavey, Director of the Georgia Tech Urban Honey Bee Project, will present a summary of cutting-edge bee-related research from around the world published over the course of the last year.
Mar
20
2019
Come see experienced improv actors and professional scientists take the stage together to put on a unique entertainment and educational experience.
Mar
28
2019
A public lecture by Kevin Hand, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technololgy
Mar
29
2019
2019 Explorigins: A networking event under the theme of exploring the universe and origins of life
Apr
02
2019
2019 WST Distinguished Lecture by Maria Zuber, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Apr
02
2019
Frontiers in Science Lecture celebrating the periodic table, with John Baez, University of California, Riverside

College of Sciences Researchers in the News

  • The science of knitting, unpicked

    Dating back more than 3,000 years, knitting is an ancient form of manufacturing, but Elisabetta Matsumoto of the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta believes that understanding how stitch types govern shape and stretchiness will be invaluable for designing new "tunable" materials. For instance, tissuelike flexible material could be manufactured to replace biological tissues, such as torn ligaments, with stretchiness and sizing personalized to fit each individual. Matsumoto is an assistant professor in the School of Physics. 

    Phys.org, Mar 6, 2019

  • Why this professor will “never go back to term papers”

    It’s not every day that a student takes the time to officially thank their professor for a great project. But that’s what Dr. Jennifer Glass’s student at Georgia Institute of Technology did after learning how to write Wikipedia articles as a class assignment. Glass is an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. This blog post discusses Glass's experience in assigning students to write for Wikipedia, instead of term papers.

    Wiki Education, Mar 1, 2019

  • Hurricanes create natural climate change labs in Puerto Rico

    The hurricanes that pounded Puerto Rico in 2017, blasting away most of its forest cover, may give scientists clues to how the world will respond to climate change and increasingly severe weather. Kim Cobb of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences commented on the new experiments at El Yunque. “It is well worth the effort,” she said. “The raw beauty of these environments is really only matched by their immense scientific potential.” The work, with commentary from Cobb, was also reported by The New Zealand Herald.

    AP News, Feb 21, 2019

  • Climate threat doubter is leading effort to advise Trump

    Kim Cobb of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences is among climate change scientists speaking out against William Happer, a point person for climate change within the Trump administration and a known critic of mainstream science climate findings. Cobb said Happer's “false, unscientific notions about climate change represent a danger to the American people.”

    AP News, Feb 21, 2019

  • As suicide rates rise, college students band together in unprecedented effort

    Struck by climbing suicide rates, third-year School of Biological Sciences major Collin Spencer organized the first Intercollegiate Mental Health Conference, which kicked off on Feb. 15, 2019.  "Mental health is one of the most pressing issues for adolescents in the country right now," Spencer says. 

    Fox News, Feb 20, 2019