News Archive

  • More Than a Motto: Joshua Jarrell Shines in Service to Others

    Ph.D. applied physiology graduate exemplifies service to country

    Georgia Tech’s motto of Progress and Service is emulated by its student body, and Joshua Jarrell is among students graduating this December who have shown passion for service while studying at Tech.

    Georgia Tech’s motto of Progress and Service is emulated by its student body. Among several students graduating this December who have shown a passion for service while studying at Tech is Joshyu Jarrell, who is receiving his Ph.D. in Applied Physiology

  • Yufei Zou, Ph.D. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    Advice to new students: Be prepared for setbacks and failures

    Yufei Zou learned about Georgia Tech while he was an undergraduate student at Peking University, in Beijing.

    Yufei Zou worked as an environmental engineer in Shanghai before coming to Georgia Tech in 2012. In that role, he provided environmental-modeling and air-quality-forecasting services to the 24 million residents of Shanghai every day. Being an air-quality forecaster in China is challenging, Yufei says. “It requires dealing with lots of information and uncertainties in meteorology and atmospheric chemistry.” To advance his career, he went abroad for a Ph.D.

  • Greg Richards, Ph.D. in Physics

    Advice to new students: Don’t be afraid to take advantage of the mental health support offered by Georgia Tech

    Gregory T. Richards applied to Georgia Tech for graduate school because of Tech’s academic reputation.

    Gregory T. Richards applied to Georgia Tech for graduate school because of Tech’s academic reputation. But what sealed the decision was Tech’s proximity to his hometown – Birmingham, Alabama

  • Kate Napier, B.S. in Physics

    Advice to new students: Develop well-roundedness; take time for what makes you happy

    Katherine Avery “Kate” Napier had wanted to attend Georgia Tech ever since she was in elementary school.

    Katherine Avery “Kate” Napier had wanted to attend Georgia Tech ever since she was in elementary school. Growing up, she attended summer robotics and swim camps at Tech and participated in annual dance performances at the Ferst Center for the Arts.  “I applied to Georgia Tech for early admission,” she recalls. “I still remember opening the acceptance email surrounded by my family. I never applied to another college. It was an easy decision.”

  • Shashwat Deepali Nagar, M.S. in Bioinformatics

    Advice to new students: Start managing your time from day 1

    Georgia Tech being a premier institute for computer science was ideal for someone like Nagar who wanted to work at the interface of biology and computer science.

    Shashwat Deepali Nagar came to Georgia Tech after earning a Bachelor of Engineering in Biotechnology from Netaji Subhas Institute of Technology (NSIT), University of Delhi, in New Delhi, India. As an undergrad, he learned how to do research by working in the Computational and Structural Biology Laboratory at NSIT. 

  • Biology Graduate Continues Her Family's Georgia Tech Tradition

    Emily Siegfried comes from a family with Georgia Tech ties for more than 100 years

    Emma Siegfried is the latest in a line of family members who have been attending Georgia Tech for more than 100 years.

    When Emma Siegfried graduates this weekend, she’ll be the latest in a line of family members who have been attending Georgia Tech for more than 100 years.

  • Melat Hagos, B.S. in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    Advice to new students: Be kind to yourself; don’t let setbacks define your self-worth

    Melat M. Hagos was born in Ethiopia, grew up in Kenya, and moved to the U.S. when she was 11 years old.

    After arriving in the U.S., Melat Hagos's family did not own a computer, but her mother took her to the local library every day so she could read and find information for homework. “This led me to love reading and kept me interested in school,” she says.

  • Erin Gawron, Ph.D. in Chemistry

    Prior work experience honed skills that proved valuable in graduate school

    Erin Lea Gawron came to Georgia Tech after teaching high school science for 10 years. The experience taught her valuable skills that she used as she pursued her graduate degree.

    Erin Lea Gawron came to Georgia Tech after teaching high school science for 10 years. The experience taught her valuable skills that she used as she pursued her graduate degree. “I usually encourage undergraduates to work for a couple of years before going to graduate school,” Erin says. Having work experience helped Erin think of graduate school as more of a job than going to “school.” This framework, she says, helped her succeed in tough situations; she handled hurdles with poise because of coping skills she learned in her former workplace.

  • Sunya Fareed, B.S. in Psychology

    Advice to new students: Hard work pays off

    Having learned at Tech what it means to work hard, she is poised to build a career helping people with developmental disabilities.

    Attending Georgia Tech was an easy decision for Sunya Ali Fareed. Her brother, Shaaz Fareed, was already a Yellow Jacket, majoring in biochemistry (he graduated in 2015). Compared with other options – University of Georgia, Kennesaw State University, or Georgia State University – Georgia Tech, Sunya believed, would offer the best opportunities for success.

  • Thom Gable, Ph.D. in Psychology

    Advice to new students: Do something for yourself each day

    Academic life was agreeable to Thomas M. Gable. The transition from college to graduate school was eased by friendships and the joy of working in a Georgia Tech research lab that suited him well.

    Academic life was agreeable to Thomas M. Gable. The transition from college to graduate school was eased by friendships and the joy of working in a Georgia Tech research lab that suited him well. He graduates with a Ph.D. in Psychology, with a major in Engineering Psychology and a minor in Human Computer Interaction: Qualitative Research and Information Visualization.