A Frontiers in Science Lecture by Mindy-Millard Stafford, School of Biological Sciences

Recent work from the lab of Mindy Millard-Stafford brings attention to the cognitive effects of dehydration. The findings have garnered immense media attention, from Newsweek and National Public  to Men’s Health Magazine. Millard-Stafford discusses her Georgia Tech research leading up to this widely noticed work. 

She will discuss: Why is water essential? How much do we need? Is water the most hydrating beverage? Can you drink too much water? And based on one media headline -- Does dehydration make you dumber? 

She will reflect on the unexpected media blitz: how it happened and what lessons we might take away from this experience.

Light refreshments will be served after the lecture.

About The Speaker
A member of the Georgia Tech faculty for more than three decades, Mindy Millard-Stafford is a professor in the School of Biological Sciences, where she directs the Exercise Physiology Laboratory.

She is past president of the American College of Sports Medicine and  member of the   National Academy of Kinesiology.

The goals of her research are to seek nutritional and exercise interventions that can improve human health, well-being, and performance. Her lab is particularly focused on the importance of hydration to delay fatigue and maintain safety during exercise, especially in conditions of heat stress.

About The Frontiers in Science Lecture Series
Lectures in this series are intended to inform, engage, and inspire students, faculty, staff, and the public on developments, breakthroughs, and topics of general interest in the sciences and mathematics. Lecturers tailor their talks for nonexpert audiences.

Event Details

Date/Time:

A Frontiers in Science Lecture by Mindy-Millard Stafford, School of Biological Sciences

Recent work from the lab of Mindy Millard-Stafford brings attention to the cognitive effects of dehydration. The findings have garnered immense media attention, from Newsweek and National Public  to Men’s Health Magazine. Millard-Stafford discusses her Georgia Tech research leading up to this widely noticed work. 

She will discuss: Why is water essential? How much do we need? Is water the most hydrating beverage? Can you drink too much water? And based on one media headline -- Does dehydration make you dumber? 

She will reflect on the unexpected media blitz: how it happened and what lessons we might take away from this experience.

Light refreshments will be served after the lecture.

About The Speaker
A member of the Georgia Tech faculty for more than three decades, Mindy Millard-Stafford is a professor in the School of Biological Sciences, where she directs the Exercise Physiology Laboratory.

She is past president of the American College of Sports Medicine and  member of the   National Academy of Kinesiology.

The goals of her research are to seek nutritional and exercise interventions that can improve human health, well-being, and performance. Her lab is particularly focused on the importance of hydration to delay fatigue and maintain safety during exercise, especially in conditions of heat stress.

About The Frontiers in Science Lecture Series
Lectures in this series are intended to inform, engage, and inspire students, faculty, staff, and the public on developments, breakthroughs, and topics of general interest in the sciences and mathematics. Lecturers tailor their talks for nonexpert audiences.

Event Details

Date/Time:

September 18, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

Allie Caughman needed to step away from her studies for a little while, so she chose to listen to the new College of Sciences podcast, ScienceMatters.

"I listened to it in my room as a quick break from some homework," Caughman says.

That decision led to her becoming the winner of the Episode 4 quiz, and the latest inductee into the ScienceMatters Hall of Fame.

Caughman had a special reason for tuning in the podcast. "This week's episode was by a postdoc in Dr. Stewart's lab, so I especially wanted to make sure I listened to it," Caughman says.

That postdoctoral researcher in Episode 4 is Nastassia Patin. Caughman has worked in Stewart's lab for the past two years. She is a third year undergraduate student studying for a Bachelor of Science degree in Biological Sciences. Stewart is an associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences, runs the Marine Microbiology @Georgia Tech lab, and is a member of the Parker H. Petit Insitute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

ScienceMatters Episode 4 features the work that Patin did with Stewart on a study of the microbiome in the Georgia Aquarium's large Ocean Voyager exhibit.

The quiz question was: What is the name of the Georgia Aquarium sea turtle mentioned in Episode 4? The answer is Tank.

Caughman is focusing on microbiomes in her own research. "Starting this summer I began working on my own project on how the coral reef microbiome changes throughout a daily cycle." She received a Presidents Undergraduate Research Award (PURA) to help fund her project into the fall. "The goal of the project is to see what the microbial communities in the corals look like, and how stable or dynamic the communities are over a shorter time scale than many other studies have examined."

Caughman is from Cartersville, Georgia.

This week's episode 5 of ScienceMatters is "Visualizing the Birth of Galaxies" with John Wise, Dunn Family Associate Professor in the School of Physics.

If you would like to join the ScienceMatters Hall of Fame, enter the answer to this question: What is the name of the University of Illinois supercomputer mentioned in Episode 5 that John Wise uses for visualizations and simulations?

Submit your answer by 11 a.m. Monday, September 24, at sciencematters.gatech.edu.

 

September 17, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

Editor's Note: This story was adapted for the College of Sciences from the original story by Jennifer Salazar. The original story was published on Sept. 10, 2018, here.

A team from Georgia Tech has received an award for $3.7 million from the National Science Foundation to cover 70% of the cost of a new high-performance computing (HPC) resource for the upcoming Coda building’s data center.

College of Sciences faculty members David Sherrill and Deirdre Shoemaker are members of the Georgia Tech team.

Sherrill is a computational chemist and professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, with joint appointment in the School of Computational Sciences and Engineering (CSE), in the College of Computing. He is also the associate director for research and education at the Institute of Data Science and Engineering (IDEaS). 

Shoemaker is a gravitational wave astronomer, computational astrophysicist, and professor in the School of Physics, with an adjunct appointment in CSE. She is the director of the Georgia Tech Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, as well as IDEaS associate director for research and strategic initiatives.

The new HPC system for the Coda building is valued at $5.3 million. It will support data-driven research in astrophysics, computational biology, health sciences, computational chemistry, materials and manufacturing, and numerous other projects. It will also be used for research that improves the energy efficiency and performance of the HPC systems themselves.

The Georgia Tech team was led by Srinivas Aluru, co-executive director of IDEa) and professor in CSE.

“This project is exciting from many perspectives, but especially how it is pushing forward data and high performance computing research infrastructure at Georgia Tech,” said Aluru. “It reflects the teamwork of dozens of faculty, and also supports the work of over 50 research scientists and 200 graduate students.”

In addition to Sherrill and Shoemaker, other Georgia Tech faculty who are central to the award are Surya Kalidindi, professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering; Rich Vuduc, associate professor in CSE; and Marilyn Wolf, professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Rhesa "Ray" S. Farmer, Jr. Distinguished Chair in Embedded Computing Systems.

The system, anticipated to begin operations in 2019, will surpass the current campus capabilities. It will be used for applications that require large memories or local storage, provide modern GPU accelerators, and need large storage capacity for data and simulation results.

HPC simulations—one of several uses of the new system—are important for solving large-scale problems in hours or days, rather than months or years. Applications of these include detection of gravitational waves, climate models, performance of materials used in manufacturing or healthcare, and drug discovery.

The new HPC acquisition will coincide with the unveiling of an 80,000-square-foot data center in the new Coda building. The 21-story, 650,000-square-foot building is a new addition to Technology Square. It lies adjacent to the Georgia Tech campus and major fiber pathways connecting the Southeast.

“We worked to ensure the acquisition is well-timed to be the pivotal supercomputer in the Coda data center,” said Aluru.

 “This award is a major boon for interdisciplinary research at Georgia Tech, one that will also be a valuable addition to the HPC-based research community nationally. With Coda opening its doors soon, this supercomputer will become the premier computing resource at Georgia Tech,” said Executive Vice President for Reseach Chaouki Abdallah. One-third of the supercomputer’s cost was committed by Georgia Tech’s Office of the Executive Vice President for Research.

IDEaS and many users of the new equipment will be based in Coda. System management will be handled by the Partnership for an Advanced Computing Environment, or PACE, also residing in Coda.

Research enabled by new system will aid several national initiatives in big data, including strategic computing, materials genome, manufacturing partnerships, NSF-supported observatories such as the LIGO gravitational wave observatory, and the South Pole neutrino observatory known as IceCube.

Researchers from all levels—from early-career scientists and faculty to undergraduate students—will be the target of training and outreach. Several Georgia Tech researchers and partner institutions will be awarded time on the equipment based on scientific merit and on the national significance of proposed problems.

One-fifth of the system capacity will be dedicated to the research activities of regional partners including minority-serving institutions. Other users can participate through XSEDE, a national network of NSF supercomputers that scientists use to interactively share computing resources, data, and expertise.

“High-performance computing is a priority area for Georgia Tech. Data analysis, simulations, and computational predictive tools are essential elements of modern science, engineering and design. High-performance computing is the laboratory of the 21st century,” said Rafael L. Bras, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs and K. Harrison Brown Family Chair. “It is extremely satisfying to see a multidisciplinary team successfully work together to make this acquisition a reality. That, after all, is the spirit and culture of Coda.”

September 17, 2018 | Atlanta, GA

Episode 5 of ScienceMatters' Season 1 stars John Wise. Listen to the podcast here and read the transcript here!

Possible scenarios for the birth of stars, galaxies, and black holes come alive in the data crunching and visualizations of John Wise, a professor in the School of Physics. Wise explains how his simulations and visualizations -- some of which have won awards -- helps researchers "rewind" space and time back to the origins of the universe.

Wise studies the intricacies of the nearby and distant universe, using state-of-the-art numerical simulations that are run on the world's largest supercomputers.

Wise won the College of Sciences' Eric Immel Award in 2015 for Excellence in Teaching. He was the recipient of the Dunn Family Professorship from 2015-2017, and was a NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellow from 2007-2009.

Take a listen at sciencematters.gatech.edu.

Enter to win a prize by answering the question for Episode 5:

What is the name of the University of Illinois supercomputer mentioned in Episode 5 that John Wise uses for visualizations and simulations?

Submit your entry by 11 AM on Monday, Sept. 24, at sciencematters.gatech.edu. Answer and winner will be announced shortly after the quiz closes.

College of Sciences faculty, staff, and students are invited to join Provost Rafael L. Bras and Search Committee Chair Pinar Keskinocak, for a town hall to learn about the dean search process and timeline, and to provide feedback on the characteristics of the ideal candidate.

The international search for the new dean for the College of Sciences will be chaired by Pinar Keskinocak, William W. George Chair, H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering; College of Engineering ADVANCE Professor; and Director, Center for Health and Humanitarian Systems. The individual selected by this search committee will also hold the Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair.

Event Details

Date/Time:

College of Sciences faculty, staff, and students are invited to join Provost Rafael L. Bras and Search Committee Chair Pinar Keskinocak, for a town hall to learn about the dean search process and timeline, and to provide feedback on the characteristics of the ideal candidate.

The international search for the new dean for the College of Sciences will be chaired by Pinar Keskinocak, William W. George Chair, H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering; College of Engineering ADVANCE Professor; and Director, Center for Health and Humanitarian Systems. The individual selected by this search committee will also hold the Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair.

Event Details

Date/Time:

A Frontiers in Science Lecture by Elisabetta Matsumoto

The 2016 confirmation of Einstein's prediction of gravitational waves put the spotlight back on the importance of curvature for the physics of the universe.

The ability of mass to curve space has fueled the imagination of many, but this is by far not the only instance of warped spaces being important for physics: The materials science of the very small scale -- the science of nanostructures and nanoengineering -- is one of them.

Often these small spaces are very strongly curved, far from what mathematicians call "Euclidean." For example, two parallel lines may no longer only meet at infinity. These bizarre and exotic spaces have very unusual properties.

Until recently, many of these complex spaces defied most people's imagination, but Virtual Reality technology is helping us immerse in them.

Elisabetta Matsumoto will take us on a tour -- enabled by the latest in virtual-reality technology -- into the innate beauty and mystery of some spaces, such as the cross between a Euclidean straight line and Poincare's hyperbolic plane, which was made popular by Escher's artwork.

Real-world applications or technological uses of these mathematical insights may seem to be light-years off, but don't worry, the real world will catch up with the imagination faster than we think.

Lecture begins at 6:30 PM. Stay after the talk for a virtual-reality demo at 7:30 PM!

About The Speaker
Elisabetta Matsumoto has been on a stellar career trajectory through some of the world’s finest physics departments, including Princeton and Harvard University, but she is not your typical physics geek.

Her love of space and geometry has let her understand the complex structures of liquid crystals in unprecedented ways and predict the spontaneous formation of structures that spontaneously nano-engineer themselves from simple molecules. It has also led her to explore some of nature’s most intricate geometries for 3D printed jewelry and symmetry principles for knitted designs and fashion.

Matsumoto holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Pennsylvania. She is building her soft matter research group at Georgia Tech.

She has won several awards, including the Glenn Brown Prize by the International Society for Liquid Crystals. 

About The Frontiers in Science Lecture Series
Lectures in this series are intended to inform, engage, and inspire students, faculty, staff, and the public on developments, breakthroughs, and topics of general interest in the sciences and mathematics. Lecturers tailor their talks for nonexpert audiences.

Event Details

Date/Time:

A Frontiers in Science Lecture by Elisabetta Matsumoto

The 2016 confirmation of Einstein's prediction of gravitational waves put the spotlight back on the importance of curvature for the physics of the universe.

The ability of mass to curve space has fueled the imagination of many, but this is by far not the only instance of warped spaces being important for physics: The materials science of the very small scale -- the science of nanostructures and nanoengineering -- is one of them.

Often these small spaces are very strongly curved, far from what mathematicians call "Euclidean." For example, two parallel lines may no longer only meet at infinity. These bizarre and exotic spaces have very unusual properties.

Until recently, many of these complex spaces defied most people's imagination, but Virtual Reality technology is helping us immerse in them.

Elisabetta Matsumoto will take us on a tour -- enabled by the latest in virtual-reality technology -- into the innate beauty and mystery of some spaces, such as the cross between a Euclidean straight line and Poincare's hyperbolic plane, which was made popular by Escher's artwork.

Real-world applications or technological uses of these mathematical insights may seem to be light-years off, but don't worry, the real world will catch up with the imagination faster than we think.

Lecture begins at 6:30 PM. Stay after the talk for a virtual-reality demo at 7:30 PM!

About The Speaker
Elisabetta Matsumoto has been on a stellar career trajectory through some of the world’s finest physics departments, including Princeton and Harvard University, but she is not your typical physics geek.

Her love of space and geometry has let her understand the complex structures of liquid crystals in unprecedented ways and predict the spontaneous formation of structures that spontaneously nano-engineer themselves from simple molecules. It has also led her to explore some of nature’s most intricate geometries for 3D printed jewelry and symmetry principles for knitted designs and fashion.

Matsumoto holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Pennsylvania. She is building her soft matter research group at Georgia Tech.

She has won several awards, including the Glenn Brown Prize by the International Society for Liquid Crystals. 

About The Frontiers in Science Lecture Series
Lectures in this series are intended to inform, engage, and inspire students, faculty, staff, and the public on developments, breakthroughs, and topics of general interest in the sciences and mathematics. Lecturers tailor their talks for nonexpert audiences.

Event Details

Date/Time:

The interactive talk show "Ask An Astrobiologist" features Amanda Stockton in the Sept. 25, 2018, episode.

Stockton is an assistant professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Her research comprises three astrtobiology-related themes: analysis of extraterrestrial organic molecules in the search for life beyond Earth, fingerprinting life at Earth’s extremes, and exploring the origins of biomolecules and the emergence of life.

A primary thrust of the first theme is the development of in situ instrumentation to go out and directly examine the organic chemical environment in the extraterrestrial environment itself through landed instruments (e.g. for Mars), fly-by instruments (e.g. for Enceladus), and impactor instruments (e.g. for Europa and small bodies). 

Stockton will answer questions from host Sanjay Jom and those submitted via Twitter, Facebook, and SAGANet.chat.

Event Details

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